1. Honda's batteries are such a drain.

    A new lawsuit suggests that the batteries in the 2017-2019 Accord and CR-V are simply too weak to run the car's electrical systems. Couple that with a parasitic drain and you've got yourself a killer combo if you're a big fan of curse words and walking to work.…

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  2. Honda has filed a motion to dismiss a lawsuit that alleges the Honda Sensing safety suite is really quite dangerous.

    The consolidated lawsuit says warning messages appear for no reason and that the vehicles can suddenly change speeds while driving. Honda lawyers have come up with a list of technicalities on why the case should be tossed.…

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  3. Honda has recalled over 437,000 vehicles to prevent the engine from suddenly shutting down due to a clogged fuel pump.

    Sodium particulates, often found in cheap gas, can cling to the inside of the pump and increase resistance as they heat up. A clogged pump isn’t very effective at sending fuel to the engine and, as you might imagine, that’s a big problem.…

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  4. A proposed class-action lawsuit says it’s time for Honda to take responsibility for the well documented problem of fuel entering the crankcase and diluting the oil in the 1.5L Earth Dreams engine.

    The scope of the lawsuit is currently limited to Georgia, but it could have national implications for this growing international problem.…

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  5. For years 2013-2015 Accord and Crosstour owners have been complaining about problems with their starters and the costs associated with it.

    In addition to the threat of being stranded, owners have ponied up a lot of cash for new batteries, towing fees to the dealership, and replacement starter motors.

    And as it turns out the problem is likely a manufacturing issue. So a proposed class-action wants to know why Honda is refusing to help any owner outside of the warranty period?

    The lawsuit as it currently stands is for affected Honda owners in the state of New Jersey.

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  6. Some 9th generation Accord and 1st generation Crosstour owners are having a heck of a time getting their cars to start.

    The theory has been a combination of an underpowered battery and a defective starter motor were to blame, but there might be more to it according to Service Bulletin #16-002 which Honda released earlier this month.

    In the bulletin, the automaker says the clearance between the starter motor gear and the torque converter ring gear is not optimal and that can cause issues with the starter system.

    To fix it, technicians are advised to rotate the torque converter clockwise by one bolt in addition to replacing the starter motor. The fix is covered under warranty but that only covers vehicles up to 3 years and 36,000 miles.

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  7. how did Honda get off without having to fix the problem?

    By telling NHTSA what they wanted to hear:

    1. They said the issue can be traced to early production issues with torque sensors. Issues that were "quickly" resolved. No word on just how quick we're talking about here.
    2. They said most of those faulty sensors have already kicked the bucket ... at least they think. So nothing to worry about here, right?

    Well, NHTSA agreed. They said power steering failure was a "declining trend" and didn't warrant a recall. But of course they had to get one last jab under the ribs of owners:

    "The closing of [the investigation] does not constitute a determination that no defect exists."

    Gee, thanks guys. Full details about the investigation are available on CarComplaints.com.

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  8. Honda has announced a small, but important recall of 4-cylinder engines found in the 2014-15 Accord and 2015 CR-V.

    A manufacturing error might lead to serious engine damage. I'm no mechanic, but I'm pretty sure you need one of those in good working order to get from A to B.…

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