Honda Announces Large Body Control Module Recall for the Accord, Accord Hybrid, and Insight

Posted on
Tagged
#recall #electrical
Author
Scott McCracken
Source
carcomplaints.com
Honda Accord in front of an arched bridge

Software mistakes in over 770,000 Honda cars can suddenly disable the power windows, turn signals, windshield wipers, defroster, and rearview cameras. That's a lot of very important things. Honda has issued a recall after discovering electrical disruptions in the body control module's controller area network or CAN. Although I guess in this case it's more like a CAN'T, amirite?

About The Recall

  • The body control modules were provided by Sumitomo Electric Wiring Systems and will receive a software update as part of the recall.
  • The issue affects the 2018-2020 Accord and Accord Hybrid, as well as the 2019-2020 Insight.
  • The recall number is X95 and is expected to begin on January 18th, 2021.
More information on carcomplaints.com

Related Honda Generations

At least one model year in these 3 generations have a relationship to this story.

We track this because a generation is just a group of model years where very little changes from year-to-year. Chances are owners throughout these generation will want to know about this news. Click on a generation for more information.

  1. 10th Generation Accord

    Years
    2018–2020
    Reliability
    40th of 58
    PainRank
    17.2
    Complaints
    201
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Accord
  2. 3rd Generation Accord Hybrid

    Years
    2018–2020
    Reliability
    15th of 58
    PainRank
    2.21
    Complaints
    14
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Accord Hybrid
  3. 3rd Generation Insight

    Years
    2019–2020
    Reliability
    9th of 58
    PainRank
    0.64
    Complaints
    3
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Insight

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