1. A group of Acura owners are suing Honda because they believe problems with the car's bluetooth are draining the batteries.

    The HandsFreeLink lawsuit was filed against Honda, parent organization of Acura and one of the first companies to use Bluetooth hands-free technology, calling it HandsFreeLink.

    The system allows a driver to "pair" a smartphone with the car, but according to the plaintiff, Honda should have warned consumers about the alleged defects that cause batteries to drain at alarming rates.

    Chances are this isn't only happening to Acura owners.

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  2. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) makes a lot of announcements, but here's one thing you'll rarely hear from them: a plea to stop driving your car. Immediately.

    NHTSA says based on new testing of Takata airbag inflators, 313,000 older vehicles have a 50 percent chance of experiencing ruptures of the inflators during the deployment of the airbags. A FIFTY percent chance. That's about 49.999999% too high.…

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  3. If you thought one recall for Takata airbag inflators was a nightmare, you're really not going to like this news from CarComplaints.com.

    The 2004-2007 Accord has been recalled because they were assembled with an incorrect front passenger airbag module that doesn't comply with what Honda says is the "advanced airbag requirements._" Or put another way, the fix ain't workin'.…

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  4. Some 9th generation Accord and 1st generation Crosstour owners are having a heck of a time getting their cars to start.

    The theory has been a combination of an underpowered battery and a defective starter motor were to blame, but there might be more to it according to Service Bulletin #16-002 which Honda released earlier this month.

    In the bulletin, the automaker says the clearance between the starter motor gear and the torque converter ring gear is not optimal and that can cause issues with the starter system.

    To fix it, technicians are advised to rotate the torque converter clockwise by one bolt in addition to replacing the starter motor. The fix is covered under warranty but that only covers vehicles up to 3 years and 36,000 miles.

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  5. Your vehicle might be involved in one of the largest and most dangerous recalls in automotive history. Honda is recalling 2.2 million vehicles with PSDI-5 Takata inflators.

    You've probably heard about Takata by now. They're the ones responsible for airbag inflators that explode with too much force, sometimes sending metal shrapnel flying throughout the cabin. They're also the ones that have been linked to a number of deaths and injuries.

    The good news here is that these particular inflators (PSDI-5) don't have the same history of rupturing. The bad news is replacement parts aren't expected to be available until later this year.

    Needless to say, Takata isn't going to make anyone's holiday card list.

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  6. About 341,000 Honda Accords with Continental Automotive System airbags have been recalled.


    Honda says the 2008-2010 Honda Accords have airbags that can fail to deploy in a crash, something that has so far caused two injuries. Continental told Honda the problem is a defect in the electronic control unit of supplemental restraint system (SRS), all caused by moisture and corrosion.

    Recently, Continental announced they needed to recall 5 million airbags that were succeptible to corrosion. The airbags in question might fail to deploy in a crash.

    Honda doesn't expect parts to be ready until in the fall of 2016.…

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  7. The 10th generation Civic is off to a rough start.

    Honda is telling its dealerships to stop selling the 2016 model year until their engines can be fixed. The Civics have problems with the piston pin snap rings, and in some situations the cars were manufactured with missing piston pin snap rings. Owners of 1.5-liter turbocharged cars are not affected and the recall of the 2-liter cars hasn't been officially announced.

    Mechanics are being told to inspect the engine's 4 cylinders using a borescope. There's two issues, however. 1) There aren't enough borescopes to go around and 2) If any problems are found Honda doesn't have replacement parts ready. Other than that, this recall is going swimingly.

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  8. A lawsuit says the soy-coated, environmentally friendly electrical wiring used by Honda in 2012-2015 vehicles is irresistible to rabbits, mice, and other rodents.

    Soy vey. When the lead plaintiff brought his 2014 Crosstour in for service, the mechanic found a rabbit living in the engine compartment and using the wires as a chew toy. To be fair, it is a warm place to hang out with lots of free soy-based snacks.

    Of course, it wasn't really free. The damage cost the owner $765 dollars. That's a lot of carrots.

    We've certainly heard about this before. Honda defends itself by saying it sells anti-critter tape that can be wrapped around the wires. The tape is laced with enough capsaicin (the stuff that makes peppers hot) to melt the whiskers off anything that comes sniffing around.

    The lawsuit thinks owners shouldn't get stuck paying for repairs and the red-hot-chili-tape should be available for free. What do you think?

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  9. The 2015 CR-V has widespread vibration problems that are so bad it's actually made some owners car-sick.

    Why all the shaking? This was Honda's first attempt at combining their direct-injected "Earth Dreams" engine with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to shake out some extra MPGs.

    It worked. Unfortunately, it shakes everything else as well.…

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  10. The 2016 Pilot is having a hard time getting clearance for takeoff because despite being so new, the popular SUV has already been recalled twice.

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